Glue - plastic & magnets question

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Blade Runner
Shas'Saal
Posts: 62

Glue - plastic & magnets question

Post#1 » Mar 15 2017 04:50

After the hole for the magnet has been drilled, what is the best glue to use when gluing magnets to games workshop models?

Thanks

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Kael'yn
Fio'Ui
Posts: 1049

Re: Glue - plastic & magnets question

Post#2 » Mar 15 2017 05:04

Cyanoacrylate is the most useful glue for its quickiness and strong bond in most case. Can be tricky to glue if too fast (gel cyanoacrylate is better for its repositionning ability)
PVA glue or neoprene glue could do the job if the magnet is in a more loose fit in a pit.
Plastic glue (cement) don't stick on magnets. Do not use it

Avoid sanding the parts to be glued on rare-earth magnets: their materials could be toxic if inhalated in thin powder.

Another free advice: if you drilled a hole and not a pit and have access to the rear side, add the magnet without glue, then glue a small plastic/metal patch with cyanoacrylate from the rearside. You will avoid the glue to bleed around the magnet, will have a stronger bond than simply glue the hole walls and prevent the magnet to be pushed into the model once closed.

Blade Runner
Shas'Saal
Posts: 62

Re: Glue - plastic & magnets question

Post#3 » Mar 15 2017 07:24

So is cyanoacrylate gel - krazy glue gel?

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Kakapo42
Shas'Vre
Posts: 881

Re: Glue - plastic & magnets question

Post#4 » Mar 15 2017 07:40

Blade Runner wrote:So is cyanoacrylate gel - krazy glue gel?


Cyanoacrylate is the fancy technical name for the active ingredient in superglue. Any superglue should have it in it.
A Shas and a Kor walk into a bar...
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Gragagrogog
Shas'La
Posts: 281

Re: Glue - plastic & magnets question

Post#5 » Mar 15 2017 08:34

Neodym magnets have anticorosive coating, usualy a layer of zinc or nickel (and a layer of copper underneath that), You can lightly scratch it with a scalpel tip or 200+ grit sandpaper for better adhesion, but avoid going deeper. Also it's good to degrease the surface with alcohol, drill the hole in a way that it expands the deeper it is (ie, drill the magnet hole with proper size drill and then drill 2 small holes in the sides of the big hole) and chemicaly etch the plastic surface it you're using CA glue.

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Shas'O Darklighter
Shas'Ui
Posts: 446

Re: Glue - plastic & magnets question

Post#6 » Mar 16 2017 04:52

Wow you guys are really over complicating things. I find a drill bit that matched the size of the magnet make a hole with it by hand (because I'm an animal) then add super glue wait for it to set... lightly sand away any over spill. If you need to the magnet to be hidden dill a touch deeper then cover it with green stuff and blend the surface. I'd recommend getting the strongest grade of magnets you can. I use N52's 3x2mm round (Neodymium grade 52). These are the strongest legal at the size I use in the UK... They are band in Australia so be carful what you order. Cheap ones are N30 and really aren't worth the effort.

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Lord Mayhem
Shas'Ui
Posts: 262

Re: Glue - plastic & magnets question

Post#7 » Mar 16 2017 02:32

Personally I've really become fond of Gorilla superglue. It seems a little more shock resistant than other superglues I've used.
I have found that while superglues will hold magnets they lose their grip after a couple of years and have to be redone.

For a really good stick I'll use JB weld epoxy (which is really fun to watch near a magnet while it's still soft) https://www.amazon.com/J-B-Weld-50112-C ... weld+epoxy

The choice of glue will obviously be affected by how/where the magnet is mounted; a very tight fitting hole might get away without glue at all, exposed or tight fitting magnets should probably use superglue, while hidden or lose fitting magnets can be epoxied into place.

Jburli
Shas'La
Posts: 80

Re: Glue - plastic & magnets question

Post#8 » Jul 05 2017 06:19

Gragagrogog wrote:Neodym magnets have anticorosive coating, usualy a layer of zinc or nickel (and a layer of copper underneath that), You can lightly scratch it with a scalpel tip or 200+ grit sandpaper for better adhesion, but avoid going deeper. Also it's good to degrease the surface with alcohol, drill the hole in a way that it expands the deeper it is (ie, drill the magnet hole with proper size drill and then drill 2 small holes in the sides of the big hole) and chemicaly etch the plastic surface it you're using CA glue.


I have no idea what you just said, but I'm sure with that much attention to detail that your models look amazing.

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