Little Flags

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Joe5952
Shas
Posts: 22

Little Flags

Post#1 » Jul 20 2017 12:33

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On many of my officer or character models I like making these little flags on their bases just to add a little extra personality to my army.
Here are a couple close ups of some of my converted characters with the flags.
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I feel like they give a little semispiritual vibe to my Vior'la army and all around just look cool.
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In this humble topic I will show my process for making the little flags, step by step for you if they fit with your army's style. With no further adue let's get started.

Before we begin you should get some green stuff (probably not a whole lot if you only intend to make a few), a pair of sissors, a pair of tweezers (or a fancy sculpting tool because we will only need them for the back end to flatten some things out), a spare pulse rifle, some sort of file, plastic glue, and some water.
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First get your green stuff and make some little wobbly flags. Make sure your hands are wet during this so they don't get sticky. You will want to let your little flags dry overnight so I would recommend you make a bunch that are all in different states of being blown by the wind so you won't have to do it again any time soon.
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Now get your pulse rifle and scissors and cut it off near the base. I would also recommend filing on of the sides of the little orb on the end to make it less bulkey.
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Now attach it to your base. I recommend having a small rock to stabilize it while it dries. Then I would put some glue over the rest of the base and sprinkle little rocks over it, but that is just how I no my bases.
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Next we are going out the flag on the little flag poll, so make sure your hands are wet first. You can attach the flag poll to the base after you put the flag on, but I prefer to put the flag on last so I can make it look like the flag is billowing around the model. Get two small strings of green stuff ready and put the flag up to the side that has been filed down. Then take one of the strings and wrap it around the back of the flag diagonally so its two ends meet over the flag.
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Take the other string and wrap it around the front the other day diagonally and try to tuck in the ends under the first one.
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Finally use the end of your tweezers to further tuck the ends of the second strand in and try to press in and accentuate the places where they overlap.
After that just let it dry and you should be done!

Hope some of you find this tutorial helpful or inspiring in some way. I'm open to any questions, comments, feedback, and totally unrelated conversations. I also hope that you can see everything clearly enough in the pictures and that none of them are too dark.

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Gragagrogog
Shas'La
Shas'La
Posts: 356

Re: Little Flags

Post#2 » Jul 20 2017 12:56

Hmm, it looks kinda too thick for me... You could flatten it between 2 non-sticking papers(ie, the ones from which you remove stickers...). And pre-cut it, still in the "water bowl" phase.

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Joe5952
Shas
Posts: 22

Re: Little Flags

Post#3 » Jul 20 2017 01:11

Gragagrogog wrote:Hmm, it looks kinda too thick for me... You could flatten it between 2 non-sticking papers(ie, the ones from which you remove stickers...). And pre-cut it, still in the "water bowl" phase.

Thanks for the feedback that is probably a good idea! I will try it out on some converted models I'm building and tell you how it works out. It may be a while though because I've been pretty busy lately.

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TauMan
Shas'Ui
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Re: Little Flags

Post#4 » Jul 20 2017 04:25

Joe5952 this is a a nice little tutorial.

One suggestion about the look of the finished "flags", if you took the little scissors, and before painting them; trimmed off the rounded ends, they would look a bit more real.

The thing about green stuff and modeling is that there is always a trade off between realism versus durability.

Green stuff can be stretched out far enough to make realistic simulation of fabric. I've used it make to capes, baldrics, purity seals, and even large plant leafs. But when you make small items like these flags look more realistic, they loose durability, and are prone to breakage. Making them thick like you have, increases their durability, but over time you're still going to have breakage.

Green Stuff Tips:
1). Change the ratio of mixture from 50:50 resin versus hardener, to a 60:40 mix of resin versus hardener. That is 60 percent resin to 40 percent hardener. The material will still harden, but it will be more "rubbery" or pliable, and thus be more durable as a result. The greater softness will give whatever you make a longer life on the table top.

2). Green stuff can be rolled out like dough, if you have a flat surface that you can wet, and then use a long cylinder to then "roller pin" the green stuff. I use an old x-acto knife handle (minus blade) and it works fine as a rolling pin. A ceramic tile is a good surface to use for rolling; and If you keep the surface wet while rolling, then the green stuff won't stick to the surface, or to your roller. Just know that you'll need to practice to get the results you want.

Alternative Product
There are other putty products other than Citadel's Green Stuff. I use ProCreate Professional Sculpture's Putty by Kraftmark (Sometimes called "Grey Stuff"); but don't let the name fool you, it works just like green stuff. Instead of a ribbon of combined blue and yellow material, Grey Stuff has two separate sticks of light grey resin and dark grey hardener. When mixed together, they create a putty with an even medium grey colour, almost the colour of the plastic used by Games Workshop.

For about the price of about two ribbons of Green Stuff, you can get about three times the amount of product with ProCreate Professional Sculpture's Putty or Grey Stuff. Definitely more bang for you buck.

Hope that helps
TauMan
Viro’los gu brath!
N.Y.A.B.X.T.T.

Prophet224
Shas'Saal
Posts: 24

Re: Little Flags

Post#5 » Jul 21 2017 08:23

Very cool Joe, thank you!

Rather than flags on the ground I could see adding these directly to some of the models.

Btw - I like the battle dirt look of your fire warriors!

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Joe5952
Shas
Posts: 22

Re: Little Flags

Post#6 » Jul 21 2017 08:56

Wow Tauman thanks so much for all the tips and reccomendations. I probably will switch to grey stuff when I run out of green stuff and see how it goes, maybe even compare the results on this topic.

I'm glad that one of the masters liked my humble tutorial. It's really nice to have people like you who comment on both the big and small blogs and impart your veteran knowledge to people just starting out like myself. Thanks for making ATT a great forum!

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Gragagrogog
Shas'La
Shas'La
Posts: 356

Re: Little Flags

Post#7 » Jul 21 2017 10:11

Hmm, when talking about fragility... You could embed some carbon fiber strands into the putty. Though I'm not sure how the green stuff will stick to it if it's done underwater. Also it might be tricky to make it so the strands are in correct orientation, it might even be contraproductive if the strands are just random mess or if they take more than ~10% of volume.

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Joe5952
Shas
Posts: 22

Re: Little Flags

Post#8 » Jul 21 2017 12:13

Gragagrogog wrote:Hmm, when talking about fragility... You could embed some carbon fiber strands into the putty. Though I'm not sure how the green stuff will stick to it if it's done underwater. Also it might be tricky to make it so the strands are in correct orientation, it might even be contraproductive if the strands are just random mess or if they take more than ~10% of volume.

Oh I think I gave the wrong impression with the bowl. I didn't mean to put the strands into the water. I was just putting them in a disposable bowl to let them dry and you can just dry them on a paper plate. The water is only for your hands.
A different more flexible mix of green stuff or grey stuff would probably eliminate the fragility issue. The fiber strands would also work too.
I make sure that the strands are in the right orientation by making a bunch of them at once and try to match them after the fact. It's probably is inefficient but it's simple and it's worked for me so far.

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