Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post long term projects you have devised for your Tau or other hobby projects.
User avatar
Blueshock
Shas'Vre
Shas'Vre
Posts: 975
Contact:

Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#1 » Mar 09 2015 03:19

So I've been getting a lot of questions lately about how to make some of the scenery I've been creating. It's all cheap, it's all very simple. None of it is ridiculously detailed or super high quality, but it's fantastic stuff for gaming on and if you damage a piece it's easy to fix/repair. I decided to start up a thread to show you all how I made some of it and showcase the rest. Hopefully this will answer most of your questions and inspire others with ideas of their own. As with most of my works, everything from A-Z is always a WIP. If you have any questions about details I may have missed feel free to ask and I'd be happy to answer. Having said all that, here it is.




Image
First piece: a How to on "The Waterfall" -

Supplies -
-You'll need polystyrene foam (it's always great to have a good mix of thickness. I use 3/4", 1" and 2"). This particular piece uses exclusively 2" foam.
Other supplies include :
-Lightweight Spackle (It's gotta be the fluffy stuff, because the rest don't sand as smoothly)
-Sandpaper (Be careful about the grit you choose. You don't want to shred the heck out of the dried Spackle or Foam)
-Glue (regular plain old white glue will work for this)
- Realistic Water (Woodland Scenics)
- Water Effects (Woodland Scenics)
-Flock
-Trees
- Hot glue gun
-Moss (You can buy some from the crafting section at a local Walmart or get the more expensive Woodland Scenics/sceneArama stuff)
-Dead-fall (Broken up sticks or dead-fall purchased from Woodland Scenics)
-Sand (I used sand from my kids sandbox, but any kind works as long as it varies in size)
-Tall dry brush/grass from Woodland Scenics (I've seen people use a lot of different alternatives to this as well)
-Hobby Knife
-Spoon (Or your fingers if you don't mind them being a little sore afterwards)
-Airbrush (GW Base-coat Flamer Air Gun works for this as well as higher quality guns, I used my Iwata brush set for this particular piece so I wouldn't have to clean my brush as often)
-Paints (Vallejo colors I used are Charred Brown, Dark Green, GW Scorpion green to mix with the realistic water, Black Ink or watered down Black, Parasite Brown, Filthy Brown, GW Shadow Gray -old stuff-, Stonewall Gray, Grey Base Primer)
-Matte and Clear Varnish
Image

1- Creation process

a) You'll need to cut the foam into 4 sections, making sure you decide on the shape of your waterfall long before you do any cutting. The first section should be fairly large, giving you plenty of space below the waterfall for a river/trees and other cool stuff relating to the scenery.

b) The other 3 pieces will need to be about 1/2-3/4 the size of the 1st piece. This is your actual waterfall and will determine where the water is coming from, how neat it looks and where the drop off points will be. Each of the 3 pieces will need to be roughly similar in size, with each one slightly smaller than the next. Next you will need to glue all 3 pieces of the smaller ones together. (I would recommend the smallest being on top, the largest of the 3 being in the middle, and the middle size one on the bottom. This will give your waterfall that drop off effect while still giving you a point of origin the where water will come from. Once it dries continue to c.

c) Now you'll need to take your hobby knife and cut around the pieces to make sure all 3 layers are flush at their connected points. This is the first step to getting rid of your layers showing. Once this is done begin to pick away at the foam to create rock-faces on all 4 sides. There are many ways this can be done but the best way that I've figured out how to do it is be using a spoon or picking at it with your fingers/nails to pull chunks away. you want to leave the layer's top and bottom surfaces alone, just pick at the sides to achieve the look you want. This will also help develop the shape of your drop-offs where the water will flow.

d) Next you want to take and spackle the bejeezus out of the sides where your layers all split apart from one another. This will cover up the poor gluing job you just did (just kidding :P) and cover up all the seams to make your layers blend in. Once it dries sand it down but be careful you don't rip it apart in the process since the lightweight stuff is very touchy. You'll want to sand to get rid of the big gobs streaks and what not that were left over that make it obvious you have spackle on it.

e) Once this is done you'll want to pick pieces away on the top layer to create little holes/caverns in the rock layer on top where water has run off and created streams for it to flow from. This gives you the origin of the water flow and makes a great board edge. cleanup with spackle and sanding if needed. It also helps to spackle additional rock surfaces like I did to create more area and uneven ground so it looks realistic.

f) Last you want to Glue the bottom of the 3 layers to your 1st piece (the big one) and do the picking away around the edges to create the desired rock effect. Use spackle to build up walls and create a river bed. Take the hot glue gun and glue around the sediment of your riverbed to help contain the realistic water you'll be adding later.

Now for the fun part...

2- Painting among other things

a) Prime (I used Base Grey Vallejo Air Primer, works great)

b) Base-coat with Charred Brown (Takes about a bottle and a half of the Vallejo, any alternative works fine too. There are cheaper paints for airbrushes out there, but I just don't care)
Image

c) Now you want to paint the Riverbed and Rock-face crevices with Shadow Gray. Be careful you don't over spray anyone spot, you want to blend the color into Brown Base coat the smoother the transition the more realistic the water will look (you can help this by mixing the brown with the gray to blend it in as you go, then continue to add more and more gray til its completely gray. The Rock-Face you only want to get the deep cracks and crevices with, to add a shade and a dark gray tone to some of the rock area, the more variants in earth tone colors on the terrain the more realistic the rock will look.
Image

d) At this point you're going to want to add the highlights and grays to the rock. Mix Parasite with Filthy Brown and lightly spray on a coat to your rock surfaces and the rest of the terrain NOT including the riverbed where you sprayed the gray. Go over the rock surface on varying areas (be random and very light) with Fortress Gray to highlight the variant Grays in the Rock-faces. You want to be spontaneous to achieve a natural discoloration in the browns. You can also add Shadow Gray or even lighter Greys or Browns to change your colors to add even more variants in the sediments, I found 9 different paints to be plenty so I didn't go any further than the Stonewall Gray.

e) Finally you can lay down some watered down glue in the areas you want and Add flock to the entire terrain piece. I have about 10 different kinds and colors of flock, and no one is the wrong one. Feel free to experiment. At this step you also want to begin adding some moss and vines or whatever else you want to make it look more detailed.
Image

3- Water and what it can do for you

a) You are now ready to do your first layer of Water, this will be plain clear stuff to give you a nice surface to work with. (Each layer takes anywhere from 8 hours-24 hours to dry depending on how thick the layer is. I did this over the course of a week, with about a day give or take 5 or 6 hours in between each layer just to be sure it was nice and dry before I went onto the next step)

b) Once the 1st layer dries, your next layer you want to mix with some scorpion green. Don't over do it but you want enough to tint it a bright swampy looking green, and don't be afraid it will ruin the piece, when it dries it will blend in nicely on the edges of the water to make it look like algae/moss buildup you see in most rivers/lakes. I recommend pouring from your top layer, then letting it run down off the sides of your run-offs to add that waterfall draining effect. this will cover the sediment below and the green will focus almost entirely where the drop-offs occurred on the top layer. Be generous about it too. You don't want to have to spread it out with a brush like some tutorials suggest. The reason for this is because you want a nice settling effect with the paint, it'll dry much more natural if it isn't spread around with a brush.

c) While you're waiting on this layer to dry, go ahead and continue to add greenery. You can do like I did and put some tall Dry-grass standing up around rocks peaking out of the water, even on the shoreline. The more greenery you add the more flaws they will cover up (un-sanded surfaces, place where paint may have missed, etc.). I used strategically places Q-Tips to hold up my Dry-grass in place, if you don't glue it down you'll need to rig something up to get it to stay up over the duration of the Realistic waters drying time. Once it's dry remove the Q-Tips/Rig and continue to the next step.
Image

d) Now it's time to add the next layer of water, a nice thick coat of Realistic water will give your River body and depth. You can also add a little blue (I used a very small amount of GW Enchanted Blue do darken up the deeper areas where the water sat). Spread it out with a brush or let it settle/even out itself. Once this dries you can do any last minute highlight paints or touch-ups to the flock/sediment and add whatever greenery you have left.
Image

e) Water Effects time! Now you can follow some of the other guides on youtube/BoLS/etc for heavy waterfall. I wanted mine to just be a slow run-off type waterfall, not a Niagara Falls hence why there isn't a ton of motion in the water on the final results. Having said that however, water effects is awesome stuff! It's a must with any live body of water in your terrain, since the effects are fantastic if done correctly. You want to get a bit on the end of a brush, and Dab at it getting little blobs out at a time. Then you just dab it onto the dried water surface where any and all running water is at. Still water won't need much if any since there's absolutely no movement in the water. Be generous about how much you use, the higher you stack the blob, the more live the water will look. This is great for making small waves or waterfall areas where the run-off or water flow will hit from the top over the edge and down to the bottom (it will dry clear so it helps to mix it with a very small amount of white paint to keep it from becoming completely transparent). There are a ton of tutorials on how to use water effects, and I recommend studying them, they helped me a lot.

f) Once your water effects dry you can add the last layer of water effects. One more layer straight up to cover the Water Effects Matte nature will give it a shiny real watery effect and not just look like white paint/plastic painted over the surface. Let it dry then add your trees and you'll see the final project completed in all it's beauty. I learned being random with tree placement helps make it look more natural too. Strategically placed trees can help your army gain cover as well, so be smart about it.
Image

4- Clearcoat/Varnish

The very last step of this project is to add a clearcoat so you can set your models without damaging your beautiful scenery. I took 2 layers of Matte Varnish hand painted with a large brush (spray is sticky and gets on your trees and in the River as well, so do it by hand!) and went over all the areas not covered with water. Then I went over with 1 layer of Gloss Varnish on the River/Water areas and the Riverbed Sediment to make it glisten nice and pretty. This won't hurt your Dried water effects, but it will give it more stability when you set any models on it (I do not recommend leaving any models in one spot for long as the Realistic water is designed to be playable, so your 25mm bases will settle and create circles in the water, effectively ruining it. Keep in mind if it isn't bad the rings tend to fade away after a period of time, but the bad ones never completely disappear. This is the reason for the Gloss varnish. It adds a more stable floor for your bases buying you more time and has less ply to create the rings.) Once the Varnish solidifies all you need to do is add some Dead-fall and you are ready to play with your completed piece of Terrain. Have fun!
Image

Image

That's it for my first Terrain tutorial. Check back for more soon and feel free to comment or ask questions!

Thank you,
-Shock
My T'au Army

~My Life for the Empire~

User avatar
Mauler
Shas
Posts: 327
Contact:

Re: Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#2 » Mar 10 2015 07:30

Holy carp that is some nice results!

Thanks man, I'll be snaffling this! :D

User avatar
Aldarion
Shas'La
Shas'La
Posts: 69
Contact:

Re: Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#3 » Mar 11 2015 07:50

:eek: wooow, very impresive, realy good job.
Training in clonetrooper training center BS3!, ja!

User avatar
Blueshock
Shas'Vre
Shas'Vre
Posts: 975
Contact:

Re: Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#4 » Mar 16 2015 05:48

Image
Next up : Two-Piece Ruins Set - (not completed, will update when complete) - My best mate and I did this together as a large centerpiece project. It takes a lot to build so don't hesitate to ask your friends/family for help. I will explain this in two posts as it is 2 pieces and a lot of information to read at once.

Supplies-
-1" and 2" thick polystyrene foam (again you can mix it up if you wish, but it gets hard to cut bricks any thinner than 3/4"
-Save your cut down pieces of Polystyrene, you'll need to cut individual bricks and broken ruin pieces out of it to scatter on the terrain below.
-Lightweight Spackle (I live and die by this stuff, because it works on so many projects, dries super fast and hard and sands so smooth)
-Sandpaper (finer grit so you don't damage the foam)
-Elmer's/School Glue
-Flock
-Trees
-Sand
-Hobby Knife
-Spoon
-Toothpicks
-Popsicle Sticks (optional, use more foam if you choose to build a stone walkway instead of a wooden one)
-Airbrush
-Paints (Vallejo primer, Stonewall Grey, Black Ink, Dark Green, Charred Brown, Parasite Brown, Filthy Brown)
-Pen, GW citadel sculpting tool or Nail File (Make sure if you're using a file, you use the right type)
-Drift wood to use as large dead trees (optional)


1- Creation process - First half including the Ruins Doorway and Hillside

a) First you want to create a base and foundation for your ruins. We use 1" foam for the base and then I also cut down the foundation using 2" foam. This will raise your ruins up off the ground a little and help with molding it into the hillside. Then you'll need to cut several pieces of foam at different sizes, but it helps to take the pen and draw out what you want your ruins to look like so you can cut them in the shape you want them to be. Consider how each piece will connect with the others prior to cutting so you can be certain you don't end up with some pieces not matching up with each other. Once you have the pieces drawn out, cut them down to match the others, then use toothpicks to pin your pieces in place while you line up all the hillside pieces on the base where you want. Keep in mind if you want to build a walkway like we did, you will need to cut the back piece short (probably no higher than 3" for an overpass/bridge) and the side wall pieces will need to overhang a ways off the formation and be cut to accommodate the walkway.

b) Once you cut out the hillside (use the same technique for creating this as I did building the waterfall) Chop it into 2 pieces where the the hillside is near it's widest (almost exactly into 2 even pieces). This will make blending it into your ruins more natural and allow for alining it with the ruin wall. Put the ruins on your foundation lined up with the very edge of the foundation and pin it down, then put the hillside next to the foundation as well and line the flat side up with your ruins side wall. You want some of the foundation to be covered by your hillside so cut the hillside on the flat side underneath to allow you to put the hillside slightly over the top of the foundation (a couple inches is fine) fitting snug and tight up against the side wall.

Image
You can see here where the wall meets up with the hillside and the foundation is tucked underneath the hillside a bit nice and tightly

c) Now you need to begin gluing down the foundation to the base, and the ruins to the foundation, as well as gluing the flat side of the hillside to the ruins' side wall. Once it dries you can pull out the spackle and start filling in all the crevices and holes you don't want to be sticking out. The Hillside should blend into the ruin wall and foundation. The same goes for the Ruins blending in with the foundation, and the foundation with the base.

d) Once the Spackle dries you need to start cutting out holes in the walls and designing the brick walls and broken bout chunks of brick. This will give the ruins a more realistic look as if it has aged for many years and its crumbling to bits as well as having been through battles and taken damage in the process. There are many ways to make bricks and youtube has a fine assortment of videos explaining how to make them. We however, used a simple technique. All you have to do is cut straight lines all the way across the ruins walls using a about a 1/3rd of the blade on a hobby knife (don't cut too deep or it'll fall apart) to slice out our brick layers, then staggering lines downward in opposing patterns to make the layers look natural (See here for a visual aid). To make your bricks more realistic take a pen and run it along on the inside of all the lines you cut into the foam. Then what we did was take a nail file and round the corners of the bricks to make them look more cobblestone-like (older) Once you're done making the bricks just start plucking out random ones here and there in no particular pattern on the wall (some you may want to go all the way through, others only pluck out little chunks or half a brick). The more random it is the better it will look. When you're cutting the holes in the walls (especially the big ones) you will want to do the bricks first, then the holes so you can cut the holes out to match where the mortar fell apart.

e) As you can see from the previous images, we have taken all of out cut out bricks and chunks and glued them to the base and foundation where the wall has crumbled and broken apart. Then we took sand/gravel (you want little rock chunks in there too) and sprinkled it on the base and inside the foundation in the corners/floor as well as on the holes where the walls have collapsed to represent the crumbled ruins. Lastly you want to take some slightly finer sand and and glue it all around the base to give you your terrain. Once it is all dry you can continue to the next step.

f)It's now time for last minute touches and the wooden walkway. At this point you want to make sure everything is how you want it to look before you start painting so clean it all up and start working on the walkway. There are a few videos out there explaining how to make a wooden bridge for miniatures terrain out of Popsicle sticks and unfortunately I'm not very clear how to explain this part. Basically you need to get a handful of Popsicle sticks and cut the rounded edges off. Lay them all flat parallel to one another creating the width of bridge you desire. You want it to be exactly the same distance across as the inside of the side ruins' walls and long enough to set a unit or possibly 2 on top of without falling off. Once you lay out the sticks take a few extra sticks and lay them across your parallel sticks going straight across (you can vary this if you want) and then glue them down. Once they dry flip it over and take a pen and draw out on the end of the bridge where it has crumbled and no longer connected to the other piece of terrain. You want to make it look like the wood was broken off and the boards were cracked and you can even take a lighter to burn the edges to add effect. It's also fun to pull up some of the boards to look slightly warped as well. We've even done a few pieces where it looks like nails are being pulled from the floorboards as well. Next ling your Walkway up with the ruins and lay it down over the top of the back wall flush. It should reach across to both sides evenly and somewhat snug so it can be temporarily held up by the walls. Next you'll want to cut out support beams for underneath the bridge. This part I'll leave up to your imagination but you just want it to hold up the walkway enough so models set on it won't cause it to collapse. Later after everything's painted you'll want to glue it to the top of the ruins' back wall and support beams.


Painting - Hillside, then the Ruins

a) The Hillside painting technique is exactly the same as my waterfall. See the Rock-side section for that part. Lots of Browns and Greys, real simple. The Ruins however, are slightly different. So for starters, you'll want to prime everything. once it's all primed, add a base coat of straight Stonewall Grey. From there, you want to get a slightly darker grey or do what I did and mix a 75/25 mix of Stonewall with Black. You want to spray this on generously over your base coat. Once everything is covered, take some Black Ink or heavily watered down Black and go to town in the crevices and cracks of the foundation and ruins. (A little over spray of grey on the hillside looks nice because the ruins are crumbling and the stone and sediment are mixing which should grey the terrain a bit near the ruins' walls)

b) Once you've inked the Ruins, you need to take a straight up mix of Stonewall Grey and very lightly dust (helps to angle your brush if you're airbrushing or if you're hand painting dry-brush the stone bricks) without seeping into the cracks or crevices too much. This will give it a sense of lighting and also make the stone look very aged. the whiter the older (not pure white, but light grey), keep that in mind. Lastly go back over with a hand brush and dry-brush or re-ink spots you missed to clean up and give it a slightly dirtier look. Lastly drybrush all the corners (where the light should be shining) with a 50/50 mix of Stonewall Grey and White. Once you completed painting the Hillside and Ruins you can start flocking and adding greenery to your piece. The one thing we haven't added yet is Moss, and the stairway to the next floor which I will explain in the next section on the other half of the ruins set to complete the look. Aside from some last minute touch-ups and waiting on your trees you set into the terrain you are done!

It should look something like this prior to the moss/vines -

Image

Here is what it should look something like after adding the Greenery -

Image

It is incredible what some greenery can do to terrain. You can click on the image to view all 3 images up close on my website. Thanks

-Shock
Last edited by Blueshock on Mar 20 2015 05:42, edited 4 times in total.

User avatar
Blueshock
Shas'Vre
Shas'Vre
Posts: 975
Contact:

Re: Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#5 » Mar 17 2015 04:56

Just a quick note. I added my gallery to my website. Feel free to check it out here or just click the link in my Signature. I update the site almost daily so check back.

Thanks guys,

-Shock
My T'au Army

~My Life for the Empire~

User avatar
Blueshock
Shas'Vre
Shas'Vre
Posts: 975
Contact:

Re: Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#6 » Mar 19 2015 01:41

Moved up to previous post
Last edited by Blueshock on Mar 20 2015 05:41, edited 1 time in total.
My T'au Army

~My Life for the Empire~

User avatar
Siyath
Shas
Posts: 268

Re: Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#7 » Mar 19 2015 03:25

I don't understand why I haven't commented on this before. Thanks for the tutorials, I've really enjoyed keeping an eye on this thread. I'll bet some of this comes useful too once I get to make my own display table as well. Been weaving ideas for it for a long time now, and reading up on techniques and seeing results is really useful.

Thanks for sharing, and keep them coming. : )

User avatar
Blueshock
Shas'Vre
Shas'Vre
Posts: 975
Contact:

Re: Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#8 » Mar 20 2015 05:38

Thanks Siyath!

Ok so time to get the second piece updated...

Supplies- Still all the same + 1 large piece of Drift wood which was mentioned at the bottom of the list on piece 1 and more detail about flock/foliage/vines and moss.

1- Creation process - Second half including the Ruins stairway and Large Dead Tree

For this piece you will need to follow all the same steps as piece 1, with 2 major differences. We are replacing the Hillside with a Large Dead Tree and the Doorway with a Broken Down Wall and Stairway.

a) For the second piece we decided instead of a Hillside to add a Tree we made up from some Drift Wood we found on a riverbank that we thought would be neat to incorporate into the piece. We had some fun figuring out how to mount this to a foam board without being very unstable so we got a flat piece of small Plywood, and on the bottom of our base, cut a shallow hole in which to fit the plywood on, then we mounted the plywood on bottom and bolted the drift wood to the top of the base through the plywood to hold it solid in place on the base. This gave our base a ton of support and we could actually lift the terrain up by the Drift Wood whenever we needed to move it, avoiding any possible damage that would be caused by squishing the foam.

b) Once the Drift wood was stabilized we began building our foundation for the ruins. Just like with the Hillside piece we merged the foundation with the Drift Wood, instead this time cutting a chunk of the foundation at the corner where the tree would need to fit. After gluing that down, we built our walls and punched out holes and cut the bricks using the same techniques as we used in piece 1. After building the walkway/bridge we used all the leftover chunks of cutout foam to cut into small pieces and glued them down to the base and inside the ruins. We knocked the wall down on the sides adjacent to the Drift wood and half of the wall on the opposite side to look like rubble/ heavily-crumbled ruins. Then we cut the foundation down on the corner at an angle to create sort of a slope where the rubble had fallen. This makes a good pathway for your units to move through into cover. We put all the crumbled wall pieces in chunks scattered down the slope and spackled the entire piece using the lightweight spackle (see... I told you I live and die by this stuff).

c) Next step was to add the broken stairway leading up to the next floor. We cut out our stair pieces just using 2" thick foam and glued them to the wall, each piece being pinned in place by a cut in 2 toothpick for support. Since our walls were so thick on the ruins it shouldn't cause any trouble for you at all pinning them in place. Once the glue dries, you'll want to spackle to stairs to the wall to cover up cracks and add more support for models. If you want a full staircase you'll need to plan it out ahead of time before cutting to make sure every piece fits the dimensions you need it. This will also determine where you punch holes into your wall where it's crumbled out from weathering/battle damage. With the crumbled staircase you can generalize where everything goes on the fly and fit accordingly, so it's a much easier process. (I made the mistake of painting before I added the staircase, then realize what I missed and had to paint over it again once it was done. This was easy as the Airbrush knocked it out quick, but it's a mistake I'll learn from and plan out ahead next time)

Image
Here is the stairway Before painting/After painting/After Flocking

Painting - Ruins and Base

Just use the same exact paints and techniques I used in the first piece so both sides will match.


It should look something like this prior to the moss/vines -

Image

Greenery - Vines, Moss, Clump Foliage and Flock

In this section I want to delve a little more into detail on than I did on the first piece. The reason for this is because of how fantastic "Greenery" (green scenery for short) can be for your pieces. It will take your terrain building to a whole other level. Choosing the right kind of greenery is also important too. It needs to match the type of terrain you want your battles to take place on. Be it forest, mountains, volcanic ash, badlands, winter, whatever. Having a good selection is the best piece of advice I can suggest to you.

a) So for this piece I used a clean green flock, all one color for my base. I used watered down glue and spread it out with a spatula across the base on areas I wanted flock, until all sides of the base were covered (be careful with watered down glue, if you aren't fast enough the glue will dry too quick and won't hold any flock on it). I sprinkled on a nice dusting of flock, being generous especially where the base met the foundation of the ruins. After doing this turn it upside down and shake it off to knock off any loose flock that would otherwise fall off or stick to your models later. Once the base flock is down, you'll want to dab a bit of glue on the ruins and rocks/broken down pieces and even a little bit up the base of the large tree. Then sprinkle some of the clean flock on the glued areas to build up a nice layer of moss on your ruins, but don't overdo it as you'll want a good variety of greenery on your piece. Next I glued up other areas of the ruins on the walls, inside the holes in the walls and on the walkway/ bridge and sprinkled on a clumpier mixed version of my flock (I took 3 different green-colors/textures/sizes and mixed them together to make a mixed variant) over all the freshly glued areas. I was very strategic about where I place this flock so I could blend in the Vines and Foliage better

I used several real life ruins pictures for reference when adding my greenery to help in bringing the piece to life

b) Vines were the next step. I knew I wanted to have vines hanging from the walls and archways, especially under the walkway/bridge to add realism. I bought the vines as a pack of moss type plants I got at Michaels (craft store) for $1 a bag. I just split the moss plant into strings, creating a vine-like strand. Take a hot glue gun after splitting the strands and glue the top of the strand and stick it under an archway or to the ceiling of the holes in the walls or walkway so it is hanging down. Hot glue only takes like 20 seconds to dry completely so you won't need to hold it long in place before it stays put. It's good to have a variety of lengths and thicknesses and even hang both the top and bottom of the strands from the walls or glue the strands down their side and stick them underneath as well.the point is to have a lot hanging down, which is the biggest part of adding to the realistic effect you're trying to create. See my example images for a good visual aid.

c) the last part you'll be adding is the Foliage, using a decent variety or shapes, sizes and colors just like with the flock. Just pull smaller chunks and glue a few of them to the base up against corners and parts where the base meets the foundation. adding it into cracks and in small spaces also shows where plant life is most likely to grow from. Once this is completed you'll have finished your terrain and can put together, use one piece or the other at a time or even build more variants of the ruins to have different battlefields throughout your time playing on it.

It should looks something like this when it's done -

Image

Just an added note: These pieces are also very easy to repair, any pieces that break off or corners or edges that are damaged can generally be fixed with Spackle, a little paint and re-flock. Send me any questions if I missed something here you would like more detail about.

Thanks,
Shock!
My T'au Army

~My Life for the Empire~

User avatar
Blueshock
Shas'Vre
Shas'Vre
Posts: 975
Contact:

Re: Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#9 » Mar 20 2015 05:56

Lastly I wanted you guys to see some images of the entire set so here's a bit of the gallery of everything up close at different angles

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Comments, questions and suggestions all welcome.

Thanks,
-Shock
Last edited by Blueshock on Mar 25 2015 05:59, edited 2 times in total.
My T'au Army

~My Life for the Empire~

User avatar
Deet
Shas'La
Shas'La
Posts: 144
Contact:

Re: Blueshock's Terrain : Guides and Showcase

Post#10 » Mar 20 2015 11:57

Nice work! That's a fun one.

Return to “Project Logs”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests