T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Discuss tactical and strategic development for 40K/Tau.
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QimRas
Shas'Saal
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T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Post#1 » Dec 07 2017 12:45

Hey folks!

A lot of people talk about and focus on the Matched Play aspect of our favorite little game. However, I have never been a huge fan of Matched Play. In my private discussions with some other players on the board I am finding a lot of people don't even really know the differences between the play modes, and what they do for our army. I figured I would try to break the differences down in a general sense, as well as how they effect the T'au specifically. Chapter Approved introduced a sub-mode called Planetstrike where T'au really shine, so I figured now was the time.

Core Differences Between Matched and Open Play

Open Play includes 2 sub-modes, as well as "standard" open play. Those game modes are Open War (cards) and Apocalypse (Chapter Approved)


Standard Open Play (Missions in Base Rule Book Pg 191)
  • Play order is different than usual. You actually pick one of the three missions FIRST, then pick your army. This means you can tailor your army to your mission, making our specialist units much more usable and usually puts all-comer lists at a disadvantage.
  • Points are not used at all. "balancing" is instead done by Power Level. One mission assumes you will have an even PL, and the other two assume that one player will have a higher PL than the other. Having a higher PL locks you into a particular side, Attacker or Defender, which changes how your can deploy as well as your victory conditions. The user with the lower PL is given the advantage in both deployment and victory conditions.
  • First turn is still determined by drops, not by dice roll.
  • Strategems can be used more than once per turn.
  • There are no caps on the number of Detachments.
  • Psychic powers can be used more than once.
  • Your entire army may start in Deep Strike if it is able to, there is no limit on how many must start on the board.
T'au Specific
  • We are able to use Uplinked Markerlight more than once per turn, making it easier to get 5 ML on more than one target.
  • Suit heavy armies can mass Manta Drop
  • We can pretty easily tailor our lists toward each of the 3 basic missions.



Open War (All missions and rules are on the cards)
  • Rules wise, Open War has all the same base differences as Standard Open Play.
  • The Mission, Deployment, and Twist cards are drawn BEFORE armies are decided upon.
  • The Twist cards basically modify or break one of the base rules. One changes deployment so one side sets up completely first, then the other player sets up. Another makes all units immune to Morale. Another causes debris to rain from the sky at the start of each players turn, targeted by the player whos turn it is. These can sometimes have very little effect, but other times completely change the scenario.
  • Power Level balancing is more fluid. The list with the lower PL gets a Ruse card, which can be anything from being able to return a unit that has been destoryed to being able to take a unit and Outflank with it. These Ruse cards are only revealed when used.
  • If the lower Power Level is half or less of the greater, they get a Sudden Death card in addition to the Ruse card. This Sudden Death card has an extra mission objective on it known only to the lower PL player. If they can complete this objective they automatically win the game, regardless of other Objectives. This objective is only revealed if completed. These can be as easy as destorying a particular vehicle or % of the enemy army, or as difficult as killing the enemy Warlord with your Warlord.
  • The Ruse and Sudden Death cards are pulled AFTER the list is built, and in secret.
T'au Specific
  • T'au struggle with the warlord on warload Sudden Death in most cases. We don't really have good ways pop enemies out of groups so we can kill them.
  • Some of the Twists really do nothing useful for us, like the one that gives everything +1 attacks.
  • More later when I get my deck back.



Apocalypse (Chapter Approved pg 10)
  • Inherits all rules changes from Open Play
  • Apocalypse is designed around 150+ PL armies of a roughly even PL on each side, but the side with the actual lowest is counted as the Underdog. The Underdog wins ties.
  • There are specific rules for one side being a team.
  • Team members do not need to use Detachments that share a Keyword. Each player has their own Warlord, and one Warlord is upgraded to a Warmaster.
  • Boards are usually larger than standard size.
  • Apocalypse games have a time limit instead of a turn limit.
  • All Apocalypse games have a general reserve rule, where units can be deployed off board. These units can only be brought in during a schedule break.
  • Deployment is basically a bet. Both players bet how much time they will take to deploy. The person who bets the lowest goes first. If they don't get all their units on the board within their bet limit, the remainder are in Reserve. The other player then deploys their units, also working against the limit the bet, with the same result if they don't finish.
  • Deploying first gets your First Turn.
T'au Specific
  • The Tigershark can relatively easily kill Titanic targets without being Titanic itself. Killing a Titanic nets you a Victory Point.
  • Tau'nars. Since Apoc ignores points costs, the massive hike in points they got means nothing.



Core Differences Between Matched and Narrative Play

Narrative Play includes 2 sub-modes, as well as "standard" Narrative play. Those game modes are Planetstrike (Chapter Approved) and Stronghold Assault (Chapter Approved)


Standard Narrative Play (Missions in Base Rule Book Pg 196)
  • Play order is different than usual. You actually pick one of the three missions FIRST, then pick your army. This means you can tailor your army to your mission, making our specialist units much more usable and usually puts all-comer lists at a disadvantage.
  • Points are not used at all. "balancing" is instead done by Power Level.
  • First turn is still determined by drops, not by dice roll.
  • Strategems can be used more than once per turn.
  • There are no caps on the number of Detachments.
  • Psychic powers can be used more than once.
  • Your entire army may start in Deep Strike if it is able to, there is no limit on how many must start on the board.
  • Each mission has special deployment, game length, and victory rules. These can drastically change how whole armies play.
  • Each of the missions has a unique set of Strategems specific to that mission. These usually interact with the mission special rules.
T'au Specific
  • We are able to use Uplinked Markerlight more than once per turn, making it easier to get 5 ML on more than one target.
  • Suit heavy armies can mass Manta Drop
  • We can pretty easily tailor our lists toward each of the 3 basic missions.
  • The Dawn Raid special rule removes 1 from Shooting rolls first turn. This can hit us pretty hard, especially combined with other modifiers. T'au will generally need to use and abuse strategems to negate the penalty, or wait until the penalty wears off before dropping.
  • The Sustained Assault rule makes ablative Drones interesting, since more can potentially come on the board. A gunline near the board edge can get an almost unlimited number of Drones.
  • We have an edge in Escape Missions, since all our vehicle Fly. We can basically just hightail it right off the board and win, and there is little an enemy can do to block us. Same goes for Blitz missions.
  • During missions with Sentries our Drones are amazing. They end up being sneakier than Stealth Suits, while being just as manueverable. With 1CP a unit of Stealth Suits can be made just as sneaky as Drones though.



Planetstrike (Chapter Approved pg 33)
  • Planetstrike missions inherit all the base changes as standard Narrative games.
  • Planetstrike missions are set up VERY differently. The players decide ahead of time who will be the attack and who will be the defender, because armor composition changes drastically. Two new Detachments are added, one for the Attacker and one for the Defender. It is -mandatory- that each player takes at least one of these.
  • Planetstrike detachments provide +5 CP, but the CP can only be used for Planetstrike Strategems.
  • All Planetstrike missions start with a number of Firestorm attacks, which does d6 mortal wounds in a 3 inch radius from a point on the battlefield.
  • The Defender is required to take a Fortification Network detachment. The contents of all Fortification Network detachments are free.
  • The Attacker can not take any Fortification Network detachments.
  • All Attacker units with the INFANTRY and FLY keywords can deploy by Planetary Assault. This is basically Manta Strike, but at a 6 inch range instead of 9 inch. Downside is you have to roll a 3+ for the unit to arrive, and you don't get a choice on timing.
  • Pretty much all Planetstrike games are Objective based. Kill points mean nothing.
  • The Defender gets to set up any fortication they want, and set up all their units on the board.
  • The Attacker deploys everything by Planetary Assault, with the exception of one mission, which involved protecting a landing beachhead.
  • The Attacker always has a higher PL than the Defender. Free fortifications and all that.
T'au Specific
  • Dude, free Tidewalls! And Gunrigs! And Drone Ports! (as Defender of course)
  • T'au can also use all the standard fortifications in addition to Tidewalls.
  • As Attackers, everything in our index gets to deepstrike at 6" except Broadsides and Stormsurges. And a 2cp Strategem will let you Deepstrike those too. Yeah thats right, 6" Deep Strike Breachers and Flamer Crisis. You can black out the skies with deep striking Drones.
  • The minimum for a Planetstrike Attacker Detachment is 2HQ, 3 Elite, 3 Fast Attack. AKA allt he things people want to use in our codex.
  • Everyone elses infantry gets Deep Strike too, but as the Defenders we are the only army that can EWO without a Strategem. Stormsurges and Broadsides with EWO are beasts. Even a Riptide with EWO is an area denial asset.



Stronghold Assault (Chapter Approved pg 45)
  • Stronghold Assault inherits all the base Narrative rules
  • Attacker Heavy weapons can move and fire without penalty against fortifications
  • Just like Planetstrike, Free fortifications for the defender. And the PL should always be higher for the Attacker.
  • Defenders get improved Leadership when near Fortifications, and their Fortification weapons get +1 to hit.
  • Just like Planetstrike, there are mandatory Detachments. Just like Planetstrike, they give +5 CP for the Stronghold Assault Strategems.
T'au Specific
  • Again, Free tidewalls and gunrigs and droneports! As the defender, of course.
  • As the defender, Gunrigs get +1 to hit.
  • With the exception of Strongpoints, our basic weapons will wound anything on a 5+. No other army can boast this. I think we are likely going to take out fortifications under weight of fire more than anything else, though Broadsides might actually be really useful in this, especially consider the move and fire ability they gain from being Attackers.
  • Flyers, especially things like Barracudas and Tigersharks, are going to rip up fortifications.

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QimRas
Shas'Saal
Posts: 303

Re: T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Post#2 » Dec 08 2017 12:12



Standard Narrative Mission: Meat Grinder



This one is an odd one for T'au. From the attacker side, it's not at all lore friendly with how we fight. That said, we do have some options on either side of this particular mission.

Victory conditions: If the Defender has any models left on the board, they win. If they get tabled, Attacker wins.

Other Rules: Sustained Assault, Preliminary Bombardment, Random Battle Length

Attacker:
  • The main trick is going to be good use of the Sustained Assault rule. Because of the way the rule works, suits should be heavily protected from fire by Drones. The reason for this is because destroyed units are returned on the board edge, not via their special deployment type. A destroyed Commander or Crisis suit is going to have to foot slog it back to where they are needed. However, if you establish waves of drones moving forward than the groups of drones the suits brought with them should return on the board edge when destroyed. Hopefully around the same time the next set of drones arrives near the suits.
  • Because drones are relatively mobile, they make for good Sustained Assault units.
  • Piranhas are also going to make good Sustained Assault units due to some shinaniganry. First, they are fast enough to get to targets. Second, their drones count as a separate unit once removed, so would regenerate separately. Third, the returned Piranhas come with a full set of Seekers. This can be punishing.
  • If we use Pulse Accelerator Drones paired with Firewarriors with Pulse Rifles, we have a surprisingly long reach with basic infantry. Destroyed Fire Warrior units arriving near a Pulse Accelerator in our deployment zone have a chance to be in range of enemy targets even the turn they arrive.
  • We can potentially use the Outflanking Reinforcements to quickly get Drones where they are needed, or potentially bring a set of Breachers in fast. It does cost 2CP though, so will need to be used sparingly.

Defender:
  • Again, our long reach can potentially allow us to reach all the way into the end of the Attacker deployment zone from a stable position, letting us kill reinforcements as they arrive.
  • Firewarriors with Shields are going to be the most durable, I think. One or two Guardian Drones mixed into a gunline may help against Craftworld or Ynnari, but likely are not useful against most other armies. They will ensure you have at least SOME save, even if the las-pred starts pounding your infantry, so might be worth one or two.
  • Sense of Stone from Ethereals is going to pay dividends, as every model you can keep on the table is one step farther way from being tabled.
  • Its all about keeping models on the table at this point, and remember that as the defender you do NOT have Sustained Assault.
  • Tidewalls are going to be useful here as a way to prevent some damage.
  • Broadsides and Riptides might see some use on the Defense side of this mission due to their durability and the ability to use Drones to save them, as well as their capacity to reach out and touch incoming units from the Attacker.
  • The Traps Strategem will give us a relatively cheap way to do some extra wounds on big units of Ork Boys, Tyranids, or other large units.

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QimRas
Shas'Saal
Posts: 303

Re: T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Post#3 » Dec 08 2017 01:14



Standard Narrative Mission: Ambush!



This one is interesting for us on both sides. On the Defender side the goal is just to run for the border and get off the board. On the attacker side the goal is to prevent the Defender from getting off the board. As the attacker we get to have all kindsa fun with this mission, using our Deep Strike and Infiltrate units to good effect. While we may struggle to kill tanks, we can rush them with suits and keep them from moving forward. As the Defender, we end up with a bit of a conundrum. The mission states we should avoid taking units with the FLY keyword but that means we basically only get access to infantry, Broadsides, and Riptides. I think it is safe to say it makes sense for us to take more than that.

Victory conditions: If the Defender can move more than 1/3rd of their armys PL off the board through the Escape Route, the Defender wins. Any less is a win for the Attacker. The Escape Route is in attackers short board edge.

Other Rules: Dawn Raid, Random Battle Length, Concealed Deployment (Attacker)

Attacker:
  • Dawn Raid is going to mean we have -1 to hit first turn, which is going to be weird for us. That said, we can use the 1CP Spectrum-Enhancement Wargear to remove that penalty for a single shooting attack. Might not be the best use of CP. The only upside is that the enemy is effected by Dawn Raid as well.
  • The attacker has control of how long Dawn Raid lasts in the form of a Strategem. Pretty sure that is not going to be a good idea for us.
  • All we have to do is stop them, not actually kill them. One way we can do this is by charging with suits or shield drones, especially at vehicles. Slower moving models can likely be ignored.
  • Piranhas will be a solid choice to act as goalies, bringing significant firepower, high speed, and decent wound count.
  • Remember, they need to get all the way through your deployment zone to the opposite short board edge! Make sure you hold something in Manta to drop down on someone making a break for it.
  • Kroot and Vespids are also likely to excel at this mission. Kroot due to a lot of area denial and cost, and Vespids due to cost and another deepstrike unit you can use to block runners.

Defender:
  • The Return Fire Strategem is an interesting one. If the Attacker shoots you first turn, you can spend 2 CP to let the unit the Attacker targeted fire back.
  • Transport Transport Transport! Don't dare try to footslog your way through this one. Devilfish may be expensive, but in this case that is a boon. Because the mission is based on % of PL, the cost of the Devilfish actually helps, assuming it does not get gutted.
  • Crisis suits are going to be a tossup in this mission. Their high PL but low footprint on the battlefield means they have a decent chance of sneaking off the board within a turn or two. However, large horde armies are going to be able to deny you drop areas near the Escape Route, which could make your Crisis Suits an anchor. If your facing an elite list, they are likely a good bet. If you are facing a horde army, likely they will be best left at home.
  • Stealth suits are in a better situation than Crisis due to their native -1 and fast movement, and not being reliant on a clear drop zone. They may be a good option against many army types.
  • Piranhas will be good at clearing holes for transports, as well as being fairly quick on their own.
  • Skyrays may be a solid option for mobile markerlights if you are using non-FW only. Everything in the army is going to have to move fast, so most other marker sources are not going to be very effective. Marker Drones are a possibility and because they are so cheap PL wise you can compensate for leaving them behind or sacrificing them relatively easily.
  • Tetras, of course, would be the best mobile marker source, and would pair well with the Piranhas Seeker Missiles

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QimRas
Shas'Saal
Posts: 303

Re: T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Post#4 » Dec 08 2017 01:57



Standard Narrative Mission: Patrol



Patrol ends up being a slightly unbalanced mission if you play it with even PLs. In general, the Attacker is going to be running a disadvantage both in Strategems and rules. That said, the army with the higher PL is classed as the attacker, making it more balanced. The biggest weirdness is with Crisis Suits and Manta Strike. Each side can only deploy 3 units to begin with during the Deployment Phase. Manta Strike has to be set during the Deployment Phase. Because of this, you have to use Crisis as part of your initial Deployment. Since you are required to put at least one Troops unit on the board, that severely limits the use of Manta Strike. Crisis can come in on a board edge as normal later, but will not be able to Manta.

In a Patrol mission, MSU is not your friend.

Victory conditions: 1 VP for each destroyed unit.

Other Rules: Reserves, Drawn to Battle, Limited Initial Deployment (Both sides)

Attacker:
  • First thing first, you will only get to deploy 3 units at the start of the game, and one has to be Troops.
  • The 2 CP Strategem Signal the Attack lets us roll all reserves that turn on a 3+, same as the Defender. While useful, easily countered with their Strategems.
  • The 2 CP Strategem Patrol in Force lets you deploy a 4th unit at the start of the game.
  • Consider using two full Kroot units and a Shaper as your starting force, as they should be durable.
  • Drones are a liability due to the Victory Points rule.
  • Firewarriors with an Ethereal is another solid choice.

Defender:
  • The 1 CP Rapid Reinforcements Stratagem allows you to automatically call in a unit from reserve. No roll needed.
  • The 1-2 CP Delayed Reserves Stratagem will reduce the attackers Reserve rolls that turn by an amount equal to the CP spent. Ouch.
  • The rest is the same as above, as the objectives are the same.

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Arka0415
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Re: T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Post#5 » Dec 10 2017 07:08

While I feel like most of us are here for competitive play, I'd be curious to hear how many players do narrative/open games.

Looking at the missions, it seems like Tau will have an advantage in anything really aggressive- if the rules give bonuses to quick units with good firepower (like in Meat Grinder) we can really multiply our shooting advantage in close range.

However, as in missions like Patrol, anything that messes with our faction's core traits (Manta Strike, etc.) is really going to hurt. Do you usually roll for missions, or choose them outright? It's odd that some might hamper us to heavily, but then again, the games aren't competitive.

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shasocastris
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Re: T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Post#6 » Dec 10 2017 07:34

I just played an Apocalypse game at 500 PL. The biggest thing, as you noted, is unlimited use of stratagems. It's not hard to get 20+ command points and thus being able to reroll all key saves on a Stormsurge or Supremacy armour. It also means we can use 'Markerlight Uplink' as much as we want. I was able to get ~4 units/turn with 5 markerlights each at least. And it really meant those units were going to be destroyed.

I've also had a great deal of fun using the Open Play cards. Each game is going to be different and it makes one be very careful when choosing any army, not merely for the opposing armies, but also to make sure you can achieve the weird objectives.

Cheers!

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QimRas
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Re: T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Post#7 » Dec 10 2017 08:36

Arka0415 wrote:Looking at the missions, it seems like Tau will have an advantage in anything really aggressive- if the rules give bonuses to quick units with good firepower (like in Meat Grinder) we can really multiply our shooting advantage in close range.

However, as in missions like Patrol, anything that messes with our faction's core traits (Manta Strike, etc.) is really going to hurt. Do you usually roll for missions, or choose them outright? It's odd that some might hamper us to heavily, but then again, the games aren't competitive.


Per RAW, standard Narrative Play and Open Play missions are picked, not rolled. In fact, they don't even have a table to roll on for it. Planetstrike and Stronghold Assault both have rollable tables, but the rules say the tables are optional.

All that said, the really big difference is that army lists are decided on AFTER the mission is. So if you decide on a mission like Patrol, as long as you know what restrictions you are working under you can pick units that work best for that mission, like taking no more than 1 or 2 Manta Strike units. In my experiences with the Patrol mission having a single squad of Crisis in Manta while taking the strategem for the 4th unit on the board, then making good use of Devilfish can give you a devastating advantage. Because units in Patrol have a tendency to trickle in instead of everyone being on board, the game comes down to local fire superiority. Because our Fire Warriors have a functional chance of putting wounds on anything in the game on a 5+ they are very strong choices for small Patrol missions because they can adapt to lots of battlefield roles, even if they are not superior on them. If you are bringing a lot of forces than Kroot are for once a solid idea because they are unlikely to be alpha struck off the board due to pure numbers, they are cheap for the number of bodies you get, and their scout move have a decent chance at being in someones grill and distracting while you get the rolls to bring in reserves and get them where they need to be on the board. Plus we have things like the Orca, which are straight up unfair in Patrol missions. We can bring in 60+ bodies on a single reserve roll (or even start it on the board if you want to be That Guy). Only Marines can do get close to that with a Thunderhawk, and those are way way way more expensive.

And its not just the aggressive missions we excel at. We are also really strong in missions with a relatively static defense. I haven't gotten to the detailed breakdown of the individual Planetstrike and Stronghold Assault missions yet, but T'au are very strong in those as well if you start looking outside the standard competitive model sets. Broadsides and Riptides, currently relegated to the shelf, suddenly gain huge appeal in games where your opponent is expected to throw dozens of deep strikers at you because of their easy access to EWO. Their PL efficiency starts to go way way up when they can have 3-5 shooting phases in a single turn. And we still have the longest ranged gunlines in the game, with pulse rifles able to reach 36 inches. In Stronghold Assault, where we can expect enemies to have to crawl longways over the board, that gives us a lot of options to strike before enemies infantry can start coming into play.

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QimRas
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Re: T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Post#8 » Dec 10 2017 08:43

shasocastris wrote:I just played an Apocalypse game at 500 PL. The biggest thing, as you noted, is unlimited use of stratagems. It's not hard to get 20+ command points and thus being able to reroll all key saves on a Stormsurge or Supremacy armour. It also means we can use 'Markerlight Uplink' as much as we want. I was able to get ~4 units/turn with 5 markerlights each at least. And it really meant those units were going to be destroyed.


Thank you for the input! I have not had a chance to do an Apocalypse game as T'au yet. What kind of army did you bring, and what were some of the highlights of the game?

shasocastris wrote:I've also had a great deal of fun using the Open Play cards. Each game is going to be different and it makes one be very careful when choosing any army, not merely for the opposing armies, but also to make sure you can achieve the weird objectives.


Totally agreed. I ended up playing AM against Marines. I wasn't thinking at all and just set up my list ahead of time. We were playing a take and hold mission, and I got my butt handed to me because the Marine player brought a couple of Drop pods. He dropped a Devastator Squad and two Tactical squads on the center objective before I was even able to move. I was never able to budge him off that objective when that Devastator Squad barraged my tanks with lascannon fire and knocked half of them out. My whole army was footslogging, so they crawled up the board and got massacred like good little Guardsman. Needless to say, I could have made a much better showing if I had tooled my list for the mission instead of using one I built before I knew the mission.

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shasocastris
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Re: T'au in Narrative and Open Play

Post#9 » Dec 10 2017 11:18

QimRas wrote:Thank you for the input! I have not had a chance to do an Apocalypse game as T'au yet. What kind of army did you bring, and what were some of the highlights of the game?


I was playing Orks. That's probably the first thing you should know. 500 PL of Orks is A LOT of orks. ~300 boyz + battlewagons, grot gunz, flyers, stompas, nobz and an assortment of characters.

My first thoughts were when I was making my army, which is that I can spend 500 PL surprisingly fast. A Supremacy Armour and 2 Stormsurges is 99 PL, a fifth of the army. I wanted to bring some broadsides but found that after taking lots of fire warriors, hammerheads, crisis suits, ghostkeels, y'vahras and kroot, I didn't have any more space. One the flip side, my opponent is a longtime friend and allowed me to use my knarloc riders and great knarloc models. They died quick but it was awesome anyway.

My exact list was (roughly):
96 fire warriors
30 pathfinders
4 hammerheads (1 was longstrike)
3 devilfish
9 crisis suits
4 commanders
3 hazards
60 kroot
20 kroot hounds
6 knarloc riders
1 great knarloc
2 Y'vahras
3 ghostkeels
2 Stormsurges
1 Ta'unar
lots of drones, ethereals, fireblades

One thing that struck me is that in large Power Level games, Tau have a much easier time killing large things because we can drop LOTS of seeker missiles. I had 14 seeker missiles and 8 destroyer missiles and they killed about 2/3 of a stompa without trying that hard. And the Ta'unar did the rest.

Another thing that was awesome was really being able to screen. Normally, in a game, I don't have enough points to properly fill the board and so I don't bother and just take more shooting. In this game, I was able to get enough models to block first turn charges and still have power levels to bring lots of shooting.

As I said before, the markerlight strategem was amazing. So was our relic. Both were used to massive effect in the first two turns, allowing me to get extremely accurate shooting and even get some CPs back. I basically had to kill about 100 boyz a turn to win, and I wouldn't have been able to do it without spamming the strategem.

Units that did well include what you'd expect. Pathfinders, fire warriors, y'vahras, and the ta'unar did crazy damage. The hammerheads were also pretty good, given that they were never really threatened and could sit back and blast away with 2+ to hit. One stormsurge died to teleporting tankbustas turn one, but the second one survived to secure the center of the board. The kroot screened well. The crisis suits and ghostkeels were a little meh, although they acted as clean up units and thus often targeted things without markerlights.

In the end, it was a decisive Tau victory. There were a few times that my opponent almost broke through, but I was able to focus fire enough to kill the fast and close things fully, and while I lost my screen, the kroot did there job in making sure that the line didn't buckle. (I even had Aun'shi hold part of the line in melee at one point, a call back to some fiction in the 2001 codex!)

It was awesome and I want to do it again. Although I want to refine the army a lot. I know 'competitive apocalypse' seems like an oxymoron but I enjoy playing with and against well thought out armies. So who knows? Maybe broadsides will be in the next list.

Cheers!

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