Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

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Rus'el
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#37 » Jan 21 2011 03:16

Firstly Freeloader, FANTASTIC army!!! Really love it. The complimentary colour scheme of the different units is a huge success; especially like the Kroot.

The tutorial is spot on! Really good advice that's easy to follow. I need to do some experimenting with washes as I'm sure they'll speed up my painting process. Just need to figure out how to get the same look as the rest of my army.

Great work!!!

Rus'el
War is not about who's right, it's about who's left!

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ruhaha2
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#38 » Jan 21 2011 04:42

Freeloader-I love all that you've done with this post. The tutorials are excellant, I've even learned a few new ways of painting. Your army looks great, and I agree with your statement about broadsides. Though on my convetions I've eliminated metal from mine all together.

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Freeloader
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#39 » Jan 22 2011 11:30

Hi!

@Rus'el
Thanks a bunch! I'm not all happy about some things in my current army, but I'm getting there. If you're gonna dive into the Art of Washing I can recommend you return to this thread sometime in the next few days. I'm putting up a basic tutorial on what I call Wash Blending, and it's a really nice technique to use. Keep at it. Washes have a mind of their own sometimes, but you domesticate those savages now, you hear?! =)

@ruhaha2
Thank you. I got a problem now with my Broadsides, 'cause I need three new ones (The Plasma Rifle variant) and I'm dead broke. Damn you Forgeworld! =)
People should laugh everyday

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Freeloader
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#40 » Feb 06 2011 05:28

Hi, everybody!

As some of you might have noticed by now, this article is in a sense a work-in-progress, I add things as I discover them myself. One thing that dawned on me a while back as I finished up my latest Crisis Suit was that I used a technique that I haven't mentioned earlier, however it is something I do all the time nowadays. And it's high time for me to share!

I've explained two things in detail previously in this article (more like a chronicle now). One thing is to paint smoothly and neat. The other one is how to paint chipping and tearing. What I'll show you now is the technique that acts as a bridge between these two.

Tau design with its streamline shapes sometimes suffer from flatness, i.e. certain areas, when painted neatly, becoming overtly boring and brand-new looking. This especially becomes apparent as one paints chipping and tearing onto the model, as the clash between the new (clean surfaces) and the veteran (chipping) creates a strange appearance. Due to this, I often utilise a technique I call wash blending to dirty-up those flat, smooth surfaces without making them look too shabby.

A note on wash blending: Use two brushes; one that you use for applying the wash. The other brush should clean and a tad bit moist – not wet. Wash blending require the brush's soak-up capability, and this is best achieved if the brush is just a little moist.

I've done some images to show the process. These images didn't end up being very descriptive, however, but hopefully they'll give a hint on what I try to explain. My apologies.

1. THE ”TOO CLEAN” SURFACE
Image
You have a surface that looks really clean. The crevasses are somewhat darker due to washing, and the highlights brightens the edges. But between these two there's a huge, flat area that looks a tad bit boring.

2. FIRST LAYER OF WASH
Image
Apply a layer of wash – Badab Black or Devlan Mud, preferably – that covers most of the surface. It should start somewhere in the deepest crevasses and stretch out to almost reach the highlights.

3. IT SHOULD LOOK SOMETHING LIKE THIS
Image
It should look like that once you've removed the brush. Oh, yes, I mean before the wash has dried.

4. DON'T LET THIS HAPPEN
Image
If the wash dries up once you've applied the first wash layer it's going to look like this – don't let it happen. And I'll show you how!

5. SMUDGE THE WASH EDGES
Image
Directly after Step 2, proceed to smudge out the edges of the wash – quickly now, before it dries up! Use you second, slightly moist brush.

6. IT SHOULD NOW LOOK MORE LIKE THIS
Image
By erasing the borders of the wash you'll get what one might call a makeshift gradient – this is good! Now, let the wash dry.

7. ANOTHER LAYER OF WASH
Image
Apply a new layer of wash, just like you did in Step 2, but within the area if the last painted layer of wash. Continue to smudge out the edges of the new layer as in Step 5.

8. REPEAT UNTIL CONTENT
Image
Repeat this whole process with washing new layers, smudging the edges, etc etc until you're happy with the result.

There you have it, basically. This technique works best on Crisis Suits, but can just as easily be applied to tanks or infantry units.

A final note on the subject. Washes are really difficult to work with and they require a lot of practise and skill. Wash blending is an advanced technique by all accounts, and it takes practise to master this technique. Personally I'm garbage at this technique, but I'm getting there.

Good luck!

/Freeloader
People should laugh everyday

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Tael
Fio'O
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#41 » Feb 06 2011 06:54

Another quality addition to your tutorials Freeloader, thanks again! Sound advice and well explained in your graphics.

For more articles by Freeloader (XV8's) and members of ATT go to [Tutorials|Supplies|Schemes] Official ATT Painting Resource

- Tael.

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Kin'D'uman Cadre
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#42 » Nov 12 2013 08:28

Great tutorial. I'm happy to see another ATT member so fond of washes. I use Agrax Earthshade like it's going out of business! I tend to use it in a manner that adds weather as well as shading, then I gradient back to the original color with one shade lighter highlight. Maybe not the cleanest models, but it suits the look I'm trying to achieve.
Kin'D'uman • "Aim straight and fire true"

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greggoman
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#43 » Dec 26 2013 12:58

I've found your tutorials fantastic and I'm really hoping to use the battle damage one.

When using the traditional Tau colour scheme of xv88 and tau light ochre what colour would you guys say would be the best for the base of the chipping out of the adeptus battlegrey and scorched brown that has been recommended?

Greggoman

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Vash
Shas'Ui
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#44 » Dec 26 2013 03:32

A good read!
Fantastic job mate.

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n1md4
Shas'La
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#45 » Oct 25 2014 05:49

Wonderful wonderful work, Freelander.

I'm a seasonal gamer and painter, and have over the years accumulated a reasonable size army, and from various sources; new, friends donations, ebay. As you can imagine the minatures I have are in various states.

Image

My question then, and I hope it's well placed here (just noticed - apologies for the necroposting), is how you would go about tackling a project like mine. Specifically, my question really boils do to this, should I construct, undercoat, and paint in bulk or in units? I know this may sound like a simple question, but each time I think about how to approach, my mind wanders around different unfinished aspects of my army - should I finish the unit I started years ago, or repair the broken models, purchase those missing parts, finish the (mild) conversions, etc - and the unsettling feelings about what and where to start usually hinder real progress. All tips, comments, suggestions will be taken onboard graciously.
This is a sad day for the nobel profession of otter milking -- Knives
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Freeloader
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Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#46 » Dec 09 2014 04:54

Hello, n1md4

Thanks for the kind words (although I shouldn't take credit - you addressed "Freelander" after all =)

You have a classic problem, and unfortunately there's no "the best answer". If the state of the army are of extremely varying quality I would probably start over again with the entire army. When you work on an army for a long time you usually "up your game" some as well. Metal models - although somewhat archaic, especially for Tau - can be cleaned and repainted. But for plastic models it's better to scrape off the old colour with a hobby knife.

Bulk-painting is a good idea, actually. I personally painted pretty much everything smaller than a Crisis Suit in bulks, but the bulk was never particularly bulky. Seldom more than five models a pop. I preferred that number. The sessions didn't take too long, and yet there was a noticeable amount of finished models with each batch.

Leave broken and models with missing pieces for later, OR concentrate fully on finishing them. Half-finished models are soooo sad to deal with. Either grab the bull by the horns, or deny the living bejeezus out of it.

Hope that answers help. As a retired Tau player, I hardly come here. I do love y'all, though!

Cheers!
/Freeloader
People should laugh everyday

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Wooday218
Shas'Saal
Posts: 38

Re: Painting a Tau Army - Advanced Course

Post#47 » Apr 06 2016 01:15

Very sweet article,especially liked what you said about black and white and nowhere to go once using them , well done and thanks

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