*Feedback Request*

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Sa'cea Mont'yr
Shas'El
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*Feedback Request*

Post#1 » Aug 13 2017 10:46

So...the girlfriend has decided to get into 40K. Shes going to be playing Necrons, but since we don't have any of those crazy machines in the house, I've subjugated my unused Kroot models to her machinations to see how she likes painting little plastic space men. This is a post asking for feeback on her painting on, quite literally, (what I'm fairly sure is) her first model ever. She was aware of what 40K was and is, but hasn't really been <i>into it</i> like I have.

That being said, be honest, but as I expressed to her, I love this site for its abundance of constructive feedback. She's nervous to hear it, but excited as well.

Things she's looking for feedback on:
1. Color combination
2. Application of said colors.
2a. To thick? To thin? etc
3. Technique
4. She's aware there are a couple of areas that haven't been finished. She's going to do some experimenting with the arms before she finishes the armpit areas.

Anyways, here you go!

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Shas'el Sa'cea Cal'Ka Mon'tyr

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Kakapo42
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Re: *Feedback Request*

Post#2 » Aug 13 2017 11:11

Well, to start with, I have to say that it's certainly a better paint job than my first 40k model. :)

I think my favourite part is the skin. I don't know if she did it intentionally or not, but whatever she did to paint the skin has ended up with a very nice combination of shading and lighter colours on the raised areas.

My main criticism would be the combination of colours on the head. I can't help but feel like the bright colours on the beak and quills seem out of place. I think it would work better if one of them were changed - my pick would be to make the head quills the same blue colour as the body quills, but altering the beak colour could work too.

When choosing colours, the biggest advice I could give is that planning is crucial. Before putting anything together take a while to think about how you want the model to look. It could be something simple like adapting the official scheme a company studio uses, or it could be influenced by inspiration from a TV show or history. Once you've got a clear idea of where you want to go you can then start working out how to get there with test models.

As a general rule of thumb, it's usually best to make sure a colour scheme is as cohesive as possible. To start with I'd suggest focusing on just two or three main colours for a model, a couple of secondary colours on smaller or rarer areas (like bare heads in an army that usually features models with helmets) with a few others applied sparingly as details or spot colours. You can use a lot of different colours at the same time on models, particularly if you want a motley or anarchic look to the model or army, but it's harder to pull off well. At the same time, try to keep the overall tone consistent between colours - if you want a model to look bright and crisp, only use a few darker colours, while if you want a darker and more subdued look, try to keep the bright colours to a minimum.

Here's a couple of examples to see what I mean. The first is a Firewarrior that I painted as a test model.

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It's a good example of a simple, coherent colour scheme - two main colours, sandy ochre on the armour and dark brown on the undersuit, with a secondary colour in the dark metal on the gun (and some of the backpack, but you can't see it from this angle) and a couple of details picked out in red, green and gold. The end result is a concise visual with a focused look.

Another example is this converted Spellsinger from my Wood Elf army.

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Again, three main colours - red hair, green cloth and white on the unicorn, with a few secondary colours (brown wood/leather, pale skin and a pale blondey yellow on the unicorn's mane and tail) and some details in spot colours. It's a little bit more complex here, as there's a couple of different variations of green and brown present, but the overall principle can still be applied.

Of course, this isn't a hard rule - painting models is after all an art, not a science, but it's a good guideline to go with when you're starting out or unsure about a colour scheme.

In terms of paint application, I'd say she's on the right track. Like I say, the skin has come out really well on this model, and while I would point out that the leather and head quills are a little flat, I'm assuming that those are still a work in progress and a trick of bad photography respectively, so I'll reserve final judgement until the model is finished.

I think that's about all I feel like I'm qualified to say at this point, but ideally it's a start.
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Overheal
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Re: *Feedback Request*

Post#3 » Aug 14 2017 03:15

Warhammer TV: Painting Kroot Skin - https://www.facebook.com/WarhammerTVtea ... 541138798/

TBH I don't think the Orange beak and purple quills work well with the skin color. I would have the quills closely resemble the scales on the skin (a bluish-green) and the beak some other more moot color, or have it match the scales also. Or I would keep the beak the same coloring as the scales then the quills can be just about any color.

His face reminds me of a fraggle...

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n1md4
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Re: *Feedback Request*

Post#4 » Aug 14 2017 04:55

Very neat painting, especially if that's the first attempt at model painting. Doesn't look too thick either. Difficult to judge the technique as it's not specified, but the end result speaks louder; technique is merely a means to an end :)
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GreenMan
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Re: *Feedback Request*

Post#5 » Aug 18 2017 02:31

For a first model, I'd say it's a pretty good paint job. As Kakapo42 pointed out, a more limited palette tends to look better. However, I must say that the first thing I thought when I saw the pictures was the example colour schemes from the original Codex: Tau; there were some VERY lurid colour combinations there, so if you like it the way you've painted it, go for it.

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Kael'yn
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Re: *Feedback Request*

Post#6 » Aug 19 2017 04:59

If this is a first painted model, it's a very good start.

Nice skin effect, a with little too saturated green but maybe because I am prefer shades of grey.

Leather coat seems too flat. A darker wash and some higlights could be done here.

Beak color is also too saturated and highlights are strange (metallic paint ?). Does she highlighted the beak with a wet brush? Because in my opinion, drybrushing is better for highlighting on organic parts.

Other keratin parts could maybe have coherent color: headspikes, claws and leg spikes here have three different colors.

A missing feature is also the eyes. It can be a pain to apply paint well, but could really add a vivid effect of the head.

The purple color on spikes is a good eye catching feature, but not on entire spikes (unless she want to do a "punk kroot")
It could be done in other ways:
- purple only on the the spike beads with contrasting color on spikes.
- Just do a purple highlight more pronounced on the end of spikes to have the eyecatching touch of purple without being too flashy.
- do a porcupine-like spikes with bands of purple

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Sa'cea Mont'yr
Shas'El
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Re: *Feedback Request*

Post#7 » Aug 19 2017 07:45

Thanks for the feedback, everyone! I'll be sure to pass the info and tips along.
Shas'el Sa'cea Cal'Ka Mon'tyr

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