Airbrushing indoors

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Temennigru
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Airbrushing indoors

Post#1 » Feb 09 2018 04:34

I purchased an airbrush recently and I'd like to know what I would need to set up so I can paint in my room. Protective masks? Goggles? A cardboard shield so the paint doesn't get everywhere?
Those sorts of things.

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n1md4
Shas'La
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Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#2 » Feb 09 2018 08:36

Basic breathing mask and ventilation are essential if you care about your health. Boxed spay booth pretty essential for a non-workshop space (made mined from an old shoe box) and I found a bin liner made for a good wider surface protector. Goggles aren't necessary (IMO), but maybe gloves to not be spraying your hand all the time. That's all I've done anyway, no problems yet.
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ErSe0831
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Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#3 » Feb 09 2018 09:34

Chiming in with what n1md4 said.

Disclaimer! I haven't tried out airbrushing myself, yet, but I have looked quite thoroughly into this subject. I'll share what I've found out: From what I gather some type of forced ventilation spray booth is required if you're going to use it in furnished rooms. For some a cardboard box and the kitchen fan is enough, for some not (guess it has to do with atmospheric? pressure). In a garage or someplace not so sensitive you could probably just spray into a cardboard box (if the room properly ventilated ofc). Either way an air mask is recommended. Theres a lot of varying opinions on this subject and you'll get different answers on what works and not. However one thing you should get is a rotating table for even priming. Hope my non-emperical knowledge will be of help :)

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Ifrit
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Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#4 » Feb 09 2018 11:44

It’s kind of a personal preference. Me personally I don’t use ventilation unless it’s primer. Mostly because the fumes aren’t too bad (if at all but maybe it depends on your paint like the GW/Vallejo because they don’t have aerosol in them) and you’re blowing away from yourself.
You definitely want some sort of protection for over spray. Honestly inside a box with two of the sides ripped off is the way to go. So you’d have 3 “walls” and a “floor”. That way you can just pick it up and leave whatever you’re working on inside the “booth”. Plus with out the “roof” light can get in and you can see what you’re working on.
I’d recommend getting a airbrush cleaner pot like this one off Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0154HN2 ... ref=plSrch
That way you can shoot whatever is left in the pot if it’s not enough to reuse.
I’d also recommend getting a compressor with a tank that way the compressor isn’t running constantly because water will build up and ruin your paint job when it comes splattering out. Learned that one the hard way. Nothing like being in the groove and then having to stop because the compressor got too hot. Then you have to let it cool down and try and blow out the water then it’ll get hot again quicker... it’s just a pain.

Wedrujacy
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Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#5 » Feb 10 2018 03:00

Regarding safety I can add by my experiance that except "box" to protect your desk you should have googles and at least simple mask.

Point is that when you will spray waterbased paint its not directly dangerous for your lungs but if you spray too much and too fast (which would happen most probably if thats your start) you will have a lot of pigmentin air around you (so including your nose) and therefore mask and googles will save your eyes, nose and lungs from contamination.

If you will use notwaterbased paint (like Mr.Hobby) you have to have real chemical protection mask and ventilation system.

PS: remember to verify if for sure you can spray a paint (if you will use not "air" paint). Thats especially important for old paints where different chemicals were used which have no impact during brushing but coudl have impact on health when sprayed.

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Osocruel
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Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#6 » Feb 10 2018 03:26

It's acrylic paint... not much worse than you've already eaten in kindergaten. I spray my base coats now because it's way faster and neater, add highlights and smooth transitions.
I use a cardboard box to prevent overspray which is literally very minimal and a latex glove on my left hand. That is it. You'll be right bro!

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nic
Kroot'Ui
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Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#7 » Feb 10 2018 04:16

Temennigru wrote:I purchased an airbrush recently and I'd like to know what I would need to set up so I can paint in my room. Protective masks? Goggles? A cardboard shield so the paint doesn't get everywhere?
Those sorts of things.


For big projects I now have an extractor fan box but for quick runs when the weather is good enough to leave the window wide open I do not always use it. If I do not use the extractor box then I definitely use a cardboard box placed right next to the window. The extractor is a lot noisier than the airbrush compressor which sometimes matters.

I have never used a mask or goggles, if I am polluting the air that badly then I think better ventilation is the way forwards. A latex glove can be nice if you do not want to be removing paint from your hands afterwards, some paints come off more easily than others.

pilky
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Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#8 » Feb 10 2018 06:18

An airbrush booth like this will help a LOT https://www.amazon.co.uk/FLOUREON-Profe ... rush+booth

It will help contain the spray, and then pull it towards the back. If you connect the hose and stick the end out of a window then most of the spray will vent outside. Sadly I can’t connect the hose on mine as my desk is too small, but even without it, it catches 90% of the spray. As it butts up against the wall behind my desk when I use it I stick a piece of paper towel to the wall that catches most of the other 10% (so you don't stain the wall). You can always get a mask on top of it, but I find that it's enough by itself.

I would counter what some have said though. Don’t assume that just because a paint is acrylic that it's ok to spray. You want to double check paints to ensure they don't contain anything harmful in the pigments. For example, Cadmium is used in some red and yellow paints. I believe Citadel paints don’t use them, but some Vallejo do. Always worth double checking before spraying (especially for paints not designed out of the pot for airbrushing)

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nic
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Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#9 » Feb 10 2018 11:31

pilky wrote:An airbrush booth like this will help a LOT https://www.amazon.co.uk/FLOUREON-Profe ... rush+booth



That is the exact one I use. Pretty good all-round and folds down to an acceptably small package for storage.

pilky
Shas'La
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Posts: 338

Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#10 » Feb 10 2018 04:22

nic wrote:
pilky wrote:An airbrush booth like this will help a LOT https://www.amazon.co.uk/FLOUREON-Profe ... rush+booth



That is the exact one I use. Pretty good all-round and folds down to an acceptably small package for storage.


Have you found any sort of half decent way of cleaning the pad at the back that doesn’t completely ruin it? It's the one problem I have with it

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nic
Kroot'Ui
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Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#11 » Feb 11 2018 06:22

pilky wrote:
nic wrote:
pilky wrote:An airbrush booth like this will help a LOT https://www.amazon.co.uk/FLOUREON-Profe ... rush+booth



That is the exact one I use. Pretty good all-round and folds down to an acceptably small package for storage.


Have you found any sort of half decent way of cleaning the pad at the back that doesn’t completely ruin it? It's the one problem I have with it


No, I have come to the conclusion I will just have to find a way to replace it every couple of years.

Co0n
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Posts: 55

Re: Airbrushing indoors

Post#12 » Feb 11 2018 07:21

I airbrush indoors aswell, use a booth so I don't paint my walls ;-)
The fumes you have to watch out for are the cleaning agents you spray through your brush for cleaning (window cleaner, airbrushcleaner etc.) and Primers / Varnishes.
For all of those I highly recommend some kind of protection. I use a basic painting mask (5€ for 3 on amazon)

for everything else, I mostly don't care. Open a window and everything should be good.

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